What Do These Breeds Have in Common?

Three years ago, we asked NPDD readers this question: The Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Greyhound, Gordon Setter, Beagle, American Foxhound, English Foxhound, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Sealyham Terrier, Scottish Terrier, Border Terrier, Airedale, Dalmatian, Bulldog, Boston Terrier, Shetland Sheepdog, Brussels Griffon, and Poodle all have standards with something in common that none of the other AKC recognized breeds have in theirs. What is it?

Since we first posted the question in 2014, the Spanish Water Dog, Miniature American Shepherd, Lagotto Romagnolo, Cirneco dell’Etna, Boerboel, Berger Picard, Bergamasco, Coton de Tulear, Wirehaired Vizsla,  Sloughi, and American Hairless Terrier have all been recognized by the AKC, but their standards don’t have it, either.

NPDD veterans, do you remember the answer?  Friends new to National Purebred Dog Day, what say you?  Warning: The answer is below this photograph of “Grip” (1978) an acrylic on terra cotta  by Anne Arnold (1925 – 2014).

Answer: What the standards of the Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Greyhound, Gordon Setter, Beagle, American Foxhound, English Foxhound, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Sealyham Terrier, Scottish Terrier, Border Terrier, Airedale, Dalmatian, Bulldog, Boston Terrier, Shetland Sheepdog, Brussels Griffon, and Poodle have in common is a point scale, a numeric value placed on various breed elements.

If you knew the answer (and good for you!), this next question may be a bit tougher. Of the breeds that have a point scale, which was the last to get AKC recognition? That answer is below this next image by Ms. Arnold, “Willow,” an acrylic on terra cotta of an Afghan Hound:

Anne Arnold,Afghan Hound,standard

Answer: In 1955, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was accepted by the AKC making it the last of the aforementioned group of breeds to be recognized. Of the same group, the first to be recognized were both the Chesapeake Bay Retriever and the Gordon Setter, AKC acceptance coming in 1878.

The thumbnail image is entitled, “Lady, an English Setter Head (1978) an acrylic on terra cotta.  Anne Arnold’s work is available at the Alexandre Gallery

4 thoughts on “What Do These Breeds Have in Common?”

  1. If I recall correctly, when the Bernese Mountain Dog Club of America revised their standard in 1980, the AKC advised them to omit the point scale. This history of the standards and how they’ve changed is fascinating.

    • It is indeed, Sally, we wonder what the thinking is behind the omission of a point scale…

      • Ostensibly, I believe, because they wanted to emphasize the entire standard, and not have fanciers concentrate on the features of each standard with the most points. The belief that serious faults and disqualifying faults in a standard (in some breeds) was enough. Everything else written should be considered important in describing the perfect, balanced specimen of that breed.

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